Everything I Know about Business, I learned Playing Video Games

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Everything I Know about Business, I learned Playing Video Games

E-book you can download Today. 140 pages of easy-to-use knowledge and forms to help your department or business to:

  • lower costs,
  • save jobs,
  • increase productivity.

There are some things about running a business that is universal. For example, there is the 80/20 rule which states that 80% of your sales will come from 20% of the SKUs/items & that 80% of your sales is obtained from 20% of your customers. 

Regardless of whether you are the owner or manager of any kind of corporation, division, department or small store, there is something in this book that will help you to lower costs, increase profits and enhance productivity. You will discover many ideas that can be immediately implemented, ideas that can save jobs and companies. 

I learned a great deal while earning ASBA, BSBA, MBA and DBA degrees, as well as from the rigorous study to earn a Certification as a Purchasing Manager. Business schools do not offer courses for insurance, so I had to go elsewhere to earn licenses in Fire & Casualty and Life insurance. Most of what I learned in school prepared me for working in the real world, where I applied book knowledge to what was taught while working in Retail, Catalog, e-commerce and Service industry positions for over thirty years.

To survive and then thrive in an extremely competitive environment, thanks to the Internet, ALL forms of business except for the rare monopoly are filled with competitors. You must also find solutions outside of your industry. The book In Search of Excellence describes what successful, and sometimes unrelated industries have in common, and is a good textbook to teach business leaders how to complete this task.

Strategy. For me, I learned of the importance to explore, to find success, and then ask myself if there is an element to be found that would give me a competitive advantage in my industry. That task of searching, then implementing a great idea was learned while playing Microsoft’s Age of Empires. Success was defined from what I learned about my opponent that allowed them to win a battle, or to possess specific resources from which to prolong the war. That video game also taught me that someone outside my sphere of influence could cause me to deplete my resources and force me out of the game, if I remained unaware of their existence or failed to defend what I had, in order to be ready & able to defeat my opponent.

What a business and a video game also have in common is that to be successful when playing most video games, that there are opponents who share the same goal to win by taking corporate (corporations are defined in business law as people) lives or property. Rules in Monopoly and early video games such as Pac Man have similar structure and definitions of success. A successful business is run by similar rules.

We keep score. For a business the score consists of sales, income, and our performance relative to competitors (market share). Fans, players and followers of a game are known in business as investors, shareholders and customers.

Innovation and change. Gamers and businesses rely upon many of the same hardware suppliers, change is constant, and successful players and managers must be skilled in the use of technology to facilitate a win.